The Shallow End

The Shallow End

you-may-call-me-raven:

thereal1990s:

Léon: The Professional (1994)

great movie

you-may-call-me-raven:

thereal1990s:

Léon: The Professional (1994)

great movie

(via whiskeyandgrit)

Don’t do that. Don’t skip stages in your life. You’re 19, kiss a few boys and wear your heart on your sleeve. There will come a time when you’re 39 and stuck in a suit, wondering why the hell you were so eager to grow up in the first place.

note to self (via c0ntemplations)

That’s what I’m sayin’

(via barbiesandbarcardi)

(via greenumbrellatrees)

thedemsocialist:

The New Colossus by Emma Lazarus. Part of her poem is on the statue of liberty. 
 
Things have changed, Emma.  Observe the “No Vacancy” sign.

thedemsocialist:

The New Colossus by Emma Lazarus. Part of her poem is on the statue of liberty. 

 

Things have changed, Emma. Observe the “No Vacancy” sign.
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 22, 1892:  “The New Colossus” Poet Emma Lazarus was Born
On this day in 1892, Emma Lazarus was born in New York City.  Her famous sonnet, “The New Colossus,” written in 1883, is engraved on a bronze plaque in the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty.  The most recognizable lines of the poem, “‘Give me your tired, your poor,/Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…’”, represent the spirit of American immigration – for which the Statue of Liberty is a shining pillar, lighting the way toward better times ahead.
On the Statue of Liberty’s 125th anniversary last year, MetroFocus and the Museum of Jewish Heritage examined Emma Lazarus’s sonnet in order to explore the statue’s meaning in the present day.

Photo: Library of Congress, c1905.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 22, 1892:  “The New Colossus” Poet Emma Lazarus was Born

On this day in 1892, Emma Lazarus was born in New York City.  Her famous sonnet, “The New Colossus,” written in 1883, is engraved on a bronze plaque in the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty.  The most recognizable lines of the poem, “‘Give me your tired, your poor,/Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…’”, represent the spirit of American immigration – for which the Statue of Liberty is a shining pillar, lighting the way toward better times ahead.

On the Statue of Liberty’s 125th anniversary last year, MetroFocus and the Museum of Jewish Heritage examined Emma Lazarus’s sonnet in order to explore the statue’s meaning in the present day.


Photo: Library of Congress, c1905.

firatunlugun:

Modest Mouse - Bukowski

(via blowtorchcigars)

ascendingreality:

For those nights when you just need to clear your head.
ascendingreality:

For those nights when you just need to clear your head.

ascendingreality:

For those nights when you just need to clear your head.

some-good-songs:

The World At Large  »  Modest Mouse

I like songs about drifters - books about the same. 
They both seem to make me feel a little less insane